Tag Archives: northern lights

Slow moving CME from Filament Eruption may arrive at Earth Jan 18

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On January 14, a filament eruption on the south-center earth-facing disk launched what appears to be a slow moving Coronal Mass Ejection. Estimated velocity of the CME indicate it may take as much as 4 to 4.5 days before it arrives at Earth. When it does, it’s possible there will be elevated KP. Due to the slow speed of the the CME, it is unlikely that it will produce significant aurora, but it could increase the KP to the highest it has been since the January 5th aurora.

Here’s an animated GIF of the solar storm launching. This eruption was so slow, that we had to speed up the images to four times the normal speed we show solar events

Slow moving CME launches from filament in the south-center Solar disk on 1/14
Slow moving CME launches from filament in the south-center Solar disk on 1/14

Happy Hunting

New Year’s 2016 Aurora Predicted – G3 Storming

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UPDATE: 20:00UTC December 31

The New Year’s Aurora of 2016 is playing out as expected in the “slower CME, longer storm” forecast scenario. There have been a few periods of G1-G2 storming. Wing-KP was overestimating the Kp and calling for 7+ earlier in the day. About 2 hours ago, Bz shifted strongly to the south and it has been in the -15nT to -17nT range since. It’s likely that the Wing-Kp model is now underestimating the actual extend of the aurora. The next 1-4 hours could produce some very good aurora. It even look likes there may be some clearing around sunset for downeast Maine, if the storm lasts another 6 hours, the upper Midwest may see northern lights around sunset as well

Some areas of clearing around sunset on the East Coast - might be able to see Aurora
Some areas of clearing around sunset on the East Coast – might be able to see Aurora

UPDATE: 04:00UTC December 31

The CME arrived! It arrived shortly after the previous update. so far Solar wind speed have been in the 425-475 km/s range, which is fairly low for a CME. The Bz component of the magnetic field has switched a couple times between negative and positive. There was a 45 minute period of sustained south orientation that pushed the KP to 5, but it has since subsided. It’s likely there will be more periods of high KP over the coming hours. Here’s is what the ACE data looked at at the moment the CME first arrived:

Bt Measured at the ACE satellite when the interplanetary shock hit.
Bt Measured at the ACE satellite when the interplanetary shock hit.

There are a lot of articles being posted about the ongoing storm. NLN has started a live updated post that contains links to those articles.

UPDATE: 00:00UTC December 31
8 hours after the official forecasted arrival of the CME, it hasn’t arrived yet. Not to worry, it is still on it’s way.

As noted in the original post, this means that it’s more likely the NASA Enlil model is closer to correct than the SWPC model. That means a wider, slower moving CME. It will bring a slightly weaker storm with slower solar wind speeds, but it also should make for a longer duration storm. This will give aurora hunters on the west coast and in Australia/NewZealand a better chance. If the storm lasts long enough, some new year’s revelers in Europe, Iceland and the East coast of the United states could be ringing in the new year under a dancing sky. Here’s the updated forecast graphic from SWPC:

Updated SWPC forecast shows G3 aurora extended to 12/31 and G1 into the new year
Updated SWPC forecast shows G3 aurora extended to 12/31 and G1 into the new year

UPDATE: 03:00UTC December 30

As the watch period begins, SWPC has updated the storm watch to G3. This means that KP=7+ is expected. There have only been a couple storms of this magnitude during this solar cycle. The timing of the start of the storm has stayed the same, roughly around 3pm UTC (10:00am EST). The duration prediction was extended to 15 hours, which should give north american viewers a better chance of seeing northern lights.

Three-day auroracast featuring day 1 with G3 storming predicted.
Three-day auroracast featuring day 1 with G3 storming predicted.

EPAM will continue to rise as the CME approaches Earth. Once the shock hits, EPAM should spike up, then start to decline. When the CME arrives at the ACE satellite, watch the Bz, if it is negative, this storm could be really good. If the Bz stays positive, this storm could top out at just KP=5, so keep your fingers crossed.

3-day EPAM graph shows a rise in electrons and protons measured at ACE as the CME approaches
3-day EPAM graph shows a rise in electrons and protons measured at ACE as the CME approaches

Also keep an eye on the arrival time of the CME. The later it arrives the weaker the storm will be, but the longer it will last (because the CME was moving slower than expected.

Original Post: 06:00UTC December 29

The Earth-directed Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) from Monday’s long duration solar flare is predicted to arrive on December 20. The Space Weather Prediction Center has issued a G2 geomagnetic storm watch for Wednesday and a G1 watch for Thursday. Aurora hunters with clear skies should get a nice show. For clouded-in skywatchers, keep an eye on the NLN Twitter feed for images of the northern lights.

Monday’s M1.86 originated from active region 2473 (Beta-Delta), the same region that produced a couple M-class flares as it rotated onto the disk about a week ago. The region was beyond the center of the Earth-strike zone during for this eruption, but was close enough for a nice CME signature on LASCO. In the CACTus image below, see the partial halo ejection:

Animated GIF from CACTus shows the partial halo CME signature from the 12/28 solar flare
Animated GIF from CACTus shows the partial halo CME signature from the 12/28 solar flare

The two main models that are used to predict the timelines of the storm are in disagreement. The official forecast model shows a stronger faster moving storm arriving around noon eastern time and lasting 6-12 hours. The NASA model shows a slower moving storm, that would be weaker, arrive later and last longer. It will be exciting to see which model proves correct. Here is the current predicted timeline for the KP according to the SWPC models.

Days Two and Three of the official max KP forecast from SWPC
Days Two and Three of the official max KP forecast from SWPC

NLN will continue to post updates on the twitter feed as this storm progresses.

Happy Hunting!

G1 Aurora Watch Posted For December 10 and 11

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Over the last several months there has been a consistent pattern where corona holes are the primary source northern lights activity prompting geomagnetic storm watches. The current storm is no exception. On December 7th a large, clearly defined coronal hole was pointed directly at Earth. The high speed solar winds shooting out from that area on the Sun are expected to arrive at Earth on December 10th and December 11th. With their arrival, there is a chance for active aurora. Here’s a look at the hole in both AIA 211 and 193 side by side:

Coronal Hole Images on Dec 7 2015 by SDO in AIA211 and AIA193 wavelengths
Coronal Hole Images on Dec 7 2015 by SDO in AIA211 and AIA193 wavelengths

As the high speed wind stream arrives early on December 10th, expect the overall Interplanetary magenetic field to first increase. It will likely increase to above 10Bt (you can monitor it live at spaceweatherlive). After that, watch for the solar wind speed to increase. There’s a chance that the solar wind speed in this storm could exceed 600 km/s, up from ambient levels around 300-350 km/s. Once those happen, the Earth’s magnetic field will be primed to respond to any disturbances traveling with the wind, and to negative z-component of the magnetic field. If the Bz shifts to the south (there’s about a 50/50 chance) for a sustained period of time, the KP will rise and there will be a good chance for Aurora.

SWPC’s is currently estimating that there will be several 3-hour periods during which the KP may increase to G1 storming level. This could happen anytime over the 48 hour watch period, but is most likely in the periods indicated on the NLN 3-day AuroraCast clock:

AuroraCast for Dec 10 and Dec 11
AuroraCast for Dec 10 and Dec 11

During the storm, follow @northlightalert on Twitter for updates (and shares of photographers’ awesome northern lights photographs) and monitor the KP live.

Happy Hunting!