Tag Archives: G1

G1 Aurora Watch Posted For December 10 and 11

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Over the last several months there has been a consistent pattern where corona holes are the primary source northern lights activity prompting geomagnetic storm watches. The current storm is no exception. On December 7th a large, clearly defined coronal hole was pointed directly at Earth. The high speed solar winds shooting out from that area on the Sun are expected to arrive at Earth on December 10th and December 11th. With their arrival, there is a chance for active aurora. Here’s a look at the hole in both AIA 211 and 193 side by side:

Coronal Hole Images on Dec 7 2015 by SDO in AIA211 and AIA193 wavelengths
Coronal Hole Images on Dec 7 2015 by SDO in AIA211 and AIA193 wavelengths

As the high speed wind stream arrives early on December 10th, expect the overall Interplanetary magenetic field to first increase. It will likely increase to above 10Bt (you can monitor it live at spaceweatherlive). After that, watch for the solar wind speed to increase. There’s a chance that the solar wind speed in this storm could exceed 600 km/s, up from ambient levels around 300-350 km/s. Once those happen, the Earth’s magnetic field will be primed to respond to any disturbances traveling with the wind, and to negative z-component of the magnetic field. If the Bz shifts to the south (there’s about a 50/50 chance) for a sustained period of time, the KP will rise and there will be a good chance for Aurora.

SWPC’s is currently estimating that there will be several 3-hour periods during which the KP may increase to G1 storming level. This could happen anytime over the 48 hour watch period, but is most likely in the periods indicated on the NLN 3-day AuroraCast clock:

AuroraCast for Dec 10 and Dec 11
AuroraCast for Dec 10 and Dec 11

During the storm, follow @northlightalert on Twitter for updates (and shares of photographers’ awesome northern lights photographs) and monitor the KP live.

Happy Hunting!

Coronal Hole Prompts 48-Hour G1 Aurora Storm Watch December 6 2015

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UPDATE December 5, 2015: The G1 watch has been extended to 72 hours. This long duration event could produce aurora at almost any time over the next three days. Keep an eye on the KP to know when it may be possible to see northern lights in your area.

Original Post:
The expected high speed solar wind stream from a large Earth-directed coronal hole has prompted SWPC to issue a G1 geomagnetic storm watch for Sunday and Monday December 6 and 7. The coronal hole responsible for the watch, CH34, is one of three currently active coronal holes on the visible Solar disk at the moment. Coronal hole 34 is the nearly circular transequitorial dark area annotated with an orange outline on this AIA 211 image taken yesterday by SDO:

Coronal hole responsible for December 6 and 7 G1 geomagnetic storm watch
Coronal hole responsible for December 6 and 7 G1 geomagnetic storm watch

The other two coronal holes are visible in the same image. CH33 is the larger northern hemisphere dark area that has already moved past the Earth strike zone. CH35 is the long coronal hole to the South and East (to the right) of CH34. Coronal holes 34 and 35 almost appear to be merging into a single large big-dipper shaped coronal hole. You can see the demarcation clearly on the NOAA Solar Synoptic Map – coronal holes are outlined with a solid line with a hash to the inside of the coronal hole:

Synoptic Map shows Coronal Holes and active Regions
Synoptic Map shows Coronal Holes and active Regions

CH35’s extension to the north and west is responsible for second day of the extended watch. As both holes grow, there is a larger area of coronal hole pointed towards Earth for a longer time. The current 3-day forecast is calling for two 3-hour periods of KP=5 (G1 storming), with a long period of potential for G4 storming in the other times. If the Bz sets up correctly, this could turn into a long duration G1 or possibly G2 event, so stay tuned and keep an eye on the KP. Here’s the current 3-day Auroracast:

AuroraCast shows Das 2 and thee each with a period of expected KP=5
AuroraCast shows Das 2 and thee each with a period of expected KP=5

Happy Hunting!

Return of Long Lived Coronal Hole – November 28

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The transequatorial coronal hole that has been visible on the Sun since April is pointed towards Earth again today. On Each of it’s previous 4 rotations (August 12, September 8, October 4 and November 1), this coronal hole has produced solar wind in excess of 600 km/s about 3-4 days later and it has been responsible for several nice aurora displays. Here’s an image of the coronal hole during the previous four rotations and today

Long Lived Coronal Hole over 5 rotations
Long Lived Coronal Hole over 5 rotations

SWPC is anticipating the high speed stream from the CH to start arriving at Late on November 30th. Solar wind speeds will likely increase to at least 600km/s. It is likely a G1 watch will be posted for Dec 1.

Happy Hunting!